MinidoMinido

A simple, generic, multi-user, database free todo list manager / tracking system written in GTK2
Though Minido is still very young, it already give a key competitive advantage to major industry players like Texas Instruments... Like TI, leverage this new paradigm to proactively re-engineer your core processes and drive cross functional empowerment!

Screenshots

These are just examples. The names and types of columns are up to the user!

Minido main window
Minido add / edit window
Minido add / edit window
Action list
Another main window example

Features

Downloads

The latest releases can be found in our releases directory. See our ChangeLog and NEWS files for details about releases.

Why I wrote this program

Installation instructions

See the INSTALL file in the sources for instructions on building and installing the tool from its sources.

How to use Minido

How to write your own profile files

These files are in XML format and are parsed by standard XML parsing libraries. Though the tags are not documented yet, they are self explanatory and you can take the below example as starting point:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<columns name="Support team">
<column name="Submit date" type="current_date" format="%b %d">
</column>
<column name="Submit time" type="current_time" format="%I:%M %p">
</column>
<column name="Severity" type="string">
        <value>Production stop</value>
        <value>Critical</value>
        <value type="default">Minor</value>
        <value>Improvement</value>
</column>
<column name="Assigned to" type="user_first_name">
        <value>Pierre</value>
        <value>Paul</value>
        <value>Jacques</value>
</column>
<column name="Comments" type="string">
</column>
</columns>

Here are available column types:

Type name
Default value
string
Empty string. If a list of values was given, the last value with the type=default attribute.
current_time
The current localized time, in the format specified by the format attribute. See the manual of the strftime function for the list of available switches.
current_date The current localized date, in the format specified by the format attribute. See the manual of the strftime function for the list of available switches.
user_real_name The full name of the current user.
user_first_name The first name of the current user. Caution: this just returns the first word of the current user real name.

If you agree to share them, I'd be glad if you send me the profiles files that you create, in any language and character set. I would like to ship more examples in the minido releases. I could use them too as a test database. Thank you in advance!

Helping

You can help the development of Minido by

Known issues

Pending work

Annex 1: strftime string format

Ordinary characters placed in the format string are copied to s without
conversion.  Conversion specifiers are introduced by a  ‘%’  character,
and are replaced in s as follows:

%a     The abbreviated weekday name according to the current locale.

%A     The full weekday name according to the current locale.

%b     The abbreviated month name according to the current locale.

%B     The full month name according to the current locale.

%c     The  preferred  date  and  time  representation  for the current
       locale.

%C     The century number (year/100) as a 2‐digit integer. (SU)

%d     The day of the month as a decimal number (range 01 to 31).

%D     Equivalent to %m/%d/%y. (Yecch ‐ for Americans only.   Americans
       should  note  that in other countries %d/%m/%y is rather common.
       This means that in international context this format is  ambigu‐
       ous and should not be used.) (SU)

%e     Like %d, the day of the month as a decimal number, but a leading
       zero is replaced by a space. (SU)

%E     Modifier: use alternative format, see below. (SU)

%F     Equivalent to %Y‐%m‐%d (the ISO 8601 date format). (C99)

%G     The ISO 8601 year with century as a decimal number.  The 4‐digit
       year  corresponding  to  the ISO week number (see %V).  This has
       the same format and value as %y, except that  if  the  ISO  week
       number  belongs  to the previous or next year, that year is used
       instead. (TZ)

%g     Like %G, but without century, i.e., with a 2‐digit year (00‐99).
       (TZ)

%h     Equivalent to %b. (SU)

%H     The  hour as a decimal number using a 24‐hour clock (range 00 to
       23).

%I     The hour as a decimal number using a 12‐hour clock (range 01  to
       12).

%j     The day of the year as a decimal number (range 001 to 366).

%k     The  hour  (24‐hour  clock) as a decimal number (range 0 to 23);
       single digits are preceded by a blank. (See also %H.) (TZ)

%l     The hour (12‐hour clock) as a decimal number (range  1  to  12);
       single digits are preceded by a blank. (See also %I.) (TZ)

%m     The month as a decimal number (range 01 to 12).

%M     The minute as a decimal number (range 00 to 59).

%n     A newline character. (SU)

%O     Modifier: use alternative format, see below. (SU)

%p     Either  ‘AM’  or  ‘PM’ according to the given time value, or the
       corresponding strings for the current locale.  Noon  is  treated
       as ‘pm’ and midnight as ‘am’.

%P     Like %p but in lowercase: ‘am’ or ‘pm’ or a corresponding string
       for the current locale. (GNU)

%r     The time in a.m. or p.m. notation.  In the POSIX locale this  is
       equivalent to ‘%I:%M:%S %p’. (SU)

%R     The time in 24‐hour notation (%H:%M). (SU) For a version includ‐
       ing the seconds, see %T below.

%s     The number of seconds since the Epoch,  i.e.,  since  1970‐01‐01
       00:00:00 UTC. (TZ)

%S     The second as a decimal number (range 00 to 61).

%t     A tab character. (SU)

%T     The time in 24‐hour notation (%H:%M:%S). (SU)

%u     The  day of the week as a decimal, range 1 to 7, Monday being 1.
       See also %w. (SU)

%U     The week number of the current year as a decimal  number,  range
       00  to  53,  starting  with the first Sunday as the first day of
       week 01. See also %V and %W.

%V     The ISO 8601:1988 week number of the current year as  a  decimal
       number,  range 01 to 53, where week 1 is the first week that has
       at least 4 days in the current year,  and  with  Monday  as  the
       first day of the week. See also %U and %W. (SU)

%w     The  day of the week as a decimal, range 0 to 6, Sunday being 0.
       See also %u.

%W     The week number of the current year as a decimal  number,  range
       00  to  53,  starting  with the first Monday as the first day of
       week 01.

%x     The preferred date representation for the current locale without
       the time.

%X     The preferred time representation for the current locale without
       the date.

%y     The year as a decimal number without a century (range 00 to 99).

%Y     The year as a decimal number including the century.

%z     The  time‐zone  as  hour  offset  from  GMT.   Required  to emit
       RFC822‐conformant dates (using "%a,  %d  %b  %Y  %H:%M:%S  %z").
       (GNU)

%Z     The time zone or name or abbreviation.

%+     The date and time in date(1) format. (TZ)

%%     A literal ‘%’ character.

Some  conversion  specifiers can be modified by preceding them by the E
or O modifier to indicate that an alternative format  should  be  used.
If  the alternative format or specification does not exist for the cur‐
rent locale, the behaviour will be  as  if  the  unmodified  conversion
specification  were  used.  (SU) The Single Unix Specification mentions
%Ec, %EC, %Ex, %EX, %Ry, %EY, %Od, %Oe, %OH, %OI, %Om, %OM,  %OS,  %Ou,
alternative numeric symbols (say, roman numerals), and that  of  the  E
modifier is to use a locale‐dependent alternative representation.

Ordinary characters placed in the format string are copied to s without
conversion.  Conversion specifiers are introduced by a  ‘%’  character,
and are replaced in s as follows:

%a     The abbreviated weekday name according to the current locale.

%A     The full weekday name according to the current locale.

%b     The abbreviated month name according to the current locale.

%B     The full month name according to the current locale.

%c     The  preferred  date  and  time  representation  for the current
       locale.

%C     The century number (year/100) as a 2‐digit integer. (SU)

%d     The day of the month as a decimal number (range 01 to 31).

%D     Equivalent to %m/%d/%y. (Yecch ‐ for Americans only.   Americans
       should  note  that in other countries %d/%m/%y is rather common.
       This means that in international context this format is  ambigu‐
       ous and should not be used.) (SU)

%e     Like %d, the day of the month as a decimal number, but a leading
              zero is replaced by a space. (SU)

%E     Modifier: use alternative format, see below. (SU)

%F     Equivalent to %Y‐%m‐%d (the ISO 8601 date format). (C99)

%G     The ISO 8601 year with century as a decimal number.  The 4‐digit
       year  corresponding  to  the ISO week number (see %V).  This has
       the same format and value as %y, except that  if  the  ISO  week
       number  belongs  to the previous or next year, that year is used
       instead. (TZ)

%g     Like %G, but without century, i.e., with a 2‐digit year (00‐99).
              (TZ)

%h     Equivalent to %b. (SU)

%H     The  hour as a decimal number using a 24‐hour clock (range 00 to
       23).

%I     The hour as a decimal number using a 12‐hour clock (range 01  to
       12).

%j     The day of the year as a decimal number (range 001 to 366).

%k     The  hour  (24‐hour  clock) as a decimal number (range 0 to 23);
       single digits are preceded by a blank. (See also %H.) (TZ)

%l     The hour (12‐hour clock) as a decimal number (range  1  to  12);
       single digits are preceded by a blank. (See also %I.) (TZ)

%m     The month as a decimal number (range 01 to 12).

%M     The minute as a decimal number (range 00 to 59).

%n     A newline character. (SU)

%O     Modifier: use alternative format, see below. (SU)

%p     Either  ‘AM’  or  ‘PM’ according to the given time value, or the
       corresponding strings for the current locale.  Noon  is  treated
       as ‘pm’ and midnight as ‘am’.

%P     Like %p but in lowercase: ‘am’ or ‘pm’ or a corresponding string
       for the current locale. (GNU)

%r     The time in a.m. or p.m. notation.  In the POSIX locale this  is
       equivalent to ‘%I:%M:%S %p’. (SU)

%R     The time in 24‐hour notation (%H:%M). (SU) For a version includ‐
       ing the seconds, see %T below.

%s     The number of seconds since the Epoch,  i.e.,  since  1970‐01‐01
       00:00:00 UTC. (TZ)

%S     The second as a decimal number (range 00 to 61).

%t     A tab character. (SU)

%T     The time in 24‐hour notation (%H:%M:%S). (SU)

%u     The  day of the week as a decimal, range 1 to 7, Monday being 1.
       See also %w. (SU)

%U     The week number of the current year as a decimal  number,  range
       00  to  53,  starting  with the first Sunday as the first day of
       week 01. See also %V and %W.

%V     The ISO 8601:1988 week number of the current year as  a  decimal
       number,  range 01 to 53, where week 1 is the first week that has
       at least 4 days in the current year,  and  with  Monday  as  the
       first day of the week. See also %U and %W. (SU)

%w     The  day of the week as a decimal, range 0 to 6, Sunday being 0.
       See also %u.

%W     The week number of the current year as a decimal  number,  range
       00  to  53,  starting  with the first Monday as the first day of
       week 01.

%x     The preferred date representation for the current locale without
       the time.

%X     The preferred time representation for the current locale without
       the date.

%y     The year as a decimal number without a century (range 00 to 99).

%Y     The year as a decimal number including the century.

%z     The  time‐zone  as  hour  offset  from  GMT.   Required  to emit
       RFC822‐conformant dates (using "%a,  %d  %b  %Y  %H:%M:%S  %z").
       (GNU)

%Z     The time zone or name or abbreviation.

%+     The date and time in date(1) format. (TZ)

%%     A literal ‘%’ character.

Some  conversion  specifiers can be modified by preceding them by the E
or O modifier to indicate that an alternative format  should  be  used.
If  the alternative format or specification does not exist for the cur‐
rent locale, the behaviour will be  as  if  the  unmodified  conversion
specification  were  used.  (SU) The Single Unix Specification mentions
%Ec, %EC, %Ex, %EX, %Ry, %EY, %Od, %Oe, %OH, %OI, %Om, %OM,  %OS,  %Ou,
%OU,  %OV,  %Ow, %OW, %Oy, where the effect of the O modifier is to use
alternative numeric symbols (say, roman numerals), and that  of  the  E
modifier is to use a locale‐dependent alternative representation.